1. "The Angry Black Woman is a racist trope used to deny black women their humanity. Black women aren’t allowed to be complicated — they’re just angry. Black women aren’t allowed to be upset or vulnerable — they’re just angry. Black women are not allowed justifiable reactions to the myriad of bullshit — racist, sexist and otherwise — that they face. Oh, you know those black ladies are just so angry all the time."
     
  2. empressque3n:

    she’s literally jesus with mascara and I love it 

    (Source: xxxmahteddykiss, via stephtr0n)

     
  3. chescaleigh:

    sistermaryfake:

    T-Murda giving you the real

    (Source: betterthankanyebitch)

     
  4. brutereason:

    connor-my-franta:

    littlebluboxx:

    silentauroriamthereal:

    nofreedomlove:

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    Source

    "Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

    When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

    Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

    "It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

    Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

    "I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

    Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

    One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

    It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

    "I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

    From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

    Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

    OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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    LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

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    LOOK

    IT GOT BETTER

    I can’t get enough of these.

    (via astralgarbage)

     

  5. seisans:

    traceexcalibur:

    "who cares about representation in video games, video games are meant for escapism"

    how exactly is it escapism to switch from a world where white cis men are in charge to…….. a world where white cis men are in charge

    also what does that say about you when you want to “escape” to a world completely devoid of poc and women

    (via casual-starlight)

     
  6. atranspaige:

    jawnthebaptiste:

    blackboybe:

    (video)

    Genocide is defined by the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide as “any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such: killing members of the group; causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; [and] forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.” 

    Let’s not have this be a trend, guys. 

    The constant killings of Black people in this country is not a trend. Discrimination and criminalization of the Black body is not a trend.             The systematic elimination of peoples from Africa both in the US and abroad is not a trend. We’re targets and it’s not a trend.

    We’re dying and it’s not a trend, it’s the standard.

    Fight with us by creating your own #BloodBucketChallenge video. 

    Instructions here

    Spread the word. Refuse silence. Stand. #WeChargeGenocide

    Reblogging to add that the people behind this challenge have specifically asked that no one who isn’t black do this challenge. if you want to support this, they’ve asked that we talk about it, share videos and pictures, tweet, etc., but do
    not do this challenge yourself.

    (via whatfreshhellisthis-deactivated)

     
  7. blackfolksmakingcomics:

    shizukasmack:

    therevtimes:

    No. 168 “The Unarmed” 

    Rest In Peace…

    to Michael Brown, John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Renisha McBride, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell And the countless other lives that have been taken away from this world due to prejudice.

    And an honor to the many people in Ferguson standing up, fighting, hoping that some kind of justice can be had in the midst of chaos.

    At last, a new Revolutionary Times comic has arrived. 

    And not a moment too soon. A little levity in these serious times is what we needed. Thank you, gentlemen.

    (via overtheunderpass)

     
  8.  

    1. teacher: are there any classes you are struggling with?
    2. me: the bourgeois
    3. teacher: what
    4. me: what
    5. karl marx: nice
     
  9. dejaentendme:

    sadchula:

    shardwick:

    It can wait.

    next time someone is mean to you just tell em this

    Pooh, perpetually a boss.

    (via tomorrowitwillbeillegal)

     
  10.  

  11. zanabism:

    being called “racist” isn’t an insult or something mean that people are saying to you because they want to bring you down. if you’re being called racist you shouldn’t be brushing it off because you “can’t see the haters” you should be assessing your behaviour, your language, and mindset for signs of prejudice, discrimination, and sympathy/support for unfair and violent treatment towards racially persecuted people in your country 

    (via itcostsalottorentaspaceship)

     
  12. the-hairy-heterophobe:

    ablogforemily:

    shamelesslyunladylike:

    the-hairy-heterophobe:

    if anybody asks me why i hate men, i’m just gonna redirect them to this post.

    it’s pretty fucking obvious that men only want to invest in breast cancer research to further degrade, objectify, and jerk off to body parts they already feel 100% entitled to. that’s what is at stake for them. 

    what about the women whose “tatas” weren’t saved? how must they feel being surrounded by awareness ads that focus more on keeping women’s sexy-sexy-titties-to-continue-titillating-the-males than saving real life human beings and helping survivors? 

    If anyone’s wondering, those posts came from here. It’s a forum for breast cancer support. Give it a read, and you’ll see how many women are outright abandoned by their husbands, sometimes after being married for decades, because their “tatas” couldn’t be saved.

    This culture of “save the tatas” even goes as far as the doctor’s offices themselves. Most doctors request that the husband be present during surgical consultations, as though he has an equal say in the patient-professional discussion.

    If the woman is single, as was my case, doctors have actually recommended postponing surgery until she finds a relationship, because “it could be nearly impossible to find someone who accepts it [your unnatural tatas] in years to come”. 

    I’m 15 months post-mastectomy, and the date I had this past week was the first time since then that a guy hadn’t reacted negatively to my scars. The relief was so overwhelming that I was fighting back tears. When I told him —essentially warning him that my body wasn’t what he must be expecting — I felt so guilty; it seemed to have the same weight and shame as telling someone I had some sort of an incurable STI or a felony record.

    I shouldn’t have felt that way. I should not be ashamed of choosing to live. 

    Thank you for your important commentary! I hope you find someone who can love you for who you are and admire your strength as a survivor.

    (via iquitelikethat)

     

  13. "October arrived, spreading a damp chill over the grounds and into the castle. Madam Pomfrey, the nurse, was kept busy by a sudden spate of colds among the staff and students. Raindrops the size of bullets thundered on the castle windows for days on end; the lake rose, the flower beds turned into muddy streams, and Hagrid’s pumpkins swelled to the size of garden sheds."
    — J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (via larmoyante)

    (via wildcosmia)

     

  14. "

    I am surprised by how much sex I have had in my life that I didn’t want to have. Not exactly what’s considered “real” rape, or “date” rape, although it is a kind of rape of the spirit - a dishonest portrayal or distortion of my own desire in order to appease another person.

    I said yes because I felt it was too much trouble to say no. I said yes because I didn’t want to have to defend my “no,” qualify it, justify it - deserve it. I said yes because I thought I was so ugly and fat that I should just take sex every time it was offered, because who knew when it would be offered again. I said yes to partners I never wanted in the first place, because to say no at any point after saying yes for so long would make our entire relationship a lie, so I had to keep saying yes in order to keep the “no” I felt a secret. That is such a messed-up way to live, such an awful way to love.

    So these days, I say yes only when I mean yes. It does require some vigilance on my part to make sure I don’t just go on sexual automatic pilot and let people do whatever. It forces me to be really honest with myself and others. It makes me remember that loving myself is also about protecting myself and defending my own borders. I say yes to me.

    "
    — Margaret Cho, “Yes Means Yes” (via scenicroutes)